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  • Writer's pictureSarah Morris Ocampo

How Long After Probate Can a Will Be Contested in Nevada?

Updated: Jun 20


Navigating the probate process can be complex, especially when contesting a will. The timeline for initiating a will contest is critical; having it can ensure your chance to challenge the will altogether.


In this blog post, we will break down the key steps and timeframes you must be aware of to contest a will during probate effectively.



When to Contest a Will During Probate


The best time to contest a will is at the beginning of the probate process. It would be best to immediately take action when you receive notification of the first probate hearing.


The best strategy is to file an objection and begin a will contest before the first hearing. This proactive approach ensures you enter your dispute as early as feasible throughout the probate proceedings.


What If You Miss the Initial Hearing?


In rare situations, you may not receive the initial probate hearing notification. If this happens, don't worry—a backup window exists to continue with the contest.


Generally, you have three months from the order date for the initial hearing to oppose the will. This extension can be handy, but it is critical to respond immediately because the additional time frame is limited.


Factors to Consider Before Contesting a Will


Contesting a will is a significant legal action with its own dangers and implications. Here are some crucial considerations to consider before moving forward:


  1. Evidence: Make sure you have substantial proof to support your claim. Wills are legally binding documents; disputing them with sufficient evidence can be more accessible and ultimately effective.

  2. No Contest Clause: Many will contain a "no contest" clause. This implies that if you are already a beneficiary in the will and decide to contest and lose, you risk losing your entire fortune. Understanding the ramifications of this phrase is critical before going with the contest.


Conclusion

When disputing a will in probate, timing is everything. Acting quickly before the first probate hearing—or within three months if you missed the initial notice—can mean the difference in your legal case.


At Ocampo Wiseman Law, we offer comprehensive legal services From probate and estate planning to family law and business litigation, our expert attorneys are here to guide you through every step. Contact us now to secure your future and achieve peace of mind.

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